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Skilled women: A distant dream in Kashmir

Bilal Dar

Kashmir is known for its unique handicraft production and has been a part of Kashmiri culture. This sector plays a vital role in income and employment generation. But it has been facing the challenge of industrialization and globalization. Handicrafts work is common in Kashmir and mostly females have learnt the handicraft skills. It can play an important role in women’s empowerment. But they need opportunity, with an environment to develop their talents. Moreover, education and training facilities are must.

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Dynasty politics faces rebellion

Khalid Isaac

After the fall of coalition got the rebel PDP MLAs have said that PDP has turned into a Family Democratic Party. Obviously politicians in Jammu and Kashmir have followed the foot steps of Nehru – Gandhi family. It seems Ms. Mehbooba is finding it had to keep the legislators together, as power that was binding force has gone. Times are changing and Modi has changed the very concept of politics. Abdullahs and Muftis will have to sit back and introspect.

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Talab: Endangered Heritage of Kashmir

Rayees Ahmad Pir

 Kashmir was known for its water bodies; ponds or ‘Sar’ played an important role, acted as storage for water during floods, and were the habitat for flora and fauna. The disappearing ponds of Kashmir due to  rapid urbanization, public encroachments and apathy of concerned department have been worrisome. There is hardly any initiative towards projecting Kashmir Environmental News. Glaciers are retreating, rainy days are decreasing, demand for water is increasing. The ponds need to be rejuvenated and conserved.

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New signposts of an unknown journey

Mehmoo Ur Rashid

Violence never left Kashmir since 1990. It underwent multiple changes. But 2016 announced the arrival of a new phase of violence. According to the commentator, incorporating opinion on Jammu and Kashmir, the core content of politics of conflict was transmitted to next generation and violence was bound to re-appear in newer forms. The forms could be dependent upon Kashmir’s internal political dynamic, international atmosphere and relationship between India and Pakistan. On all these counts nothing happened that could keep violence at bay. The result has been seen by all, more and more coffins and graveyards.

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The Climate Change

 Ashraf

 The unusual climate has been creating problems. In Kashmir the effects of climate change have been studied in detail. It reveals that between 1980-2013, nine bench mark glaciers have shrunk by 17%. The total glaciated area has been reduced from 29.01 square kilometers to 23.81 kilometers. There has been corresponding reduction in discharge of rivers dependent on glaciers. Another change has been the shifting of rainfall season from summer to spring, which could have adverse effects on agriculture. Our misfortune is not only negligence but depletion of green cover (because of felling of trees in forests) and deliberate destruction of our water bodies.

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Kishanganga Power Project

Dr. Javid Iqbal

 Kishanganga project was inaugurated by Prime Minister, though Pakistan continues to object. Indus Water Treaty (IWT) gives Pakistan control over waters of Western rivers, Chenab, Indus, Jhelum, but India has the right to make use of the ‘run of river’, and as such hydro electric projects on western rivers stand within the  provisions of the Treaty. Pakistan had taken the matter to Court of Arbitration, but the court ruled in favour of India, but left room for Pakistan to keep contesting the case. Pakistan started building its own project on the river. Yet Pakistan fears that Kishanganga project will give India control over the river. In Kashmir people are sore about NHPC exploiting state’s hydro electric resources and want the return of the projects to the state. The state has to buy power, inspite of power being generated on its projects.

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